Investing in Education - Our 21st Century Challenge

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By Assemblywoman Julia Brownley, D-Santa Monica, Chair of the Assembly Education CommitteeBrownley_Official_Photo_Color _July 07.jpg

Businesses know that smart investments are the key to future growth. Governments also make smart investments such as the one California made in higher education after adopting a master plan in 1960. Many today credit California universities for its ranking as the eighth largest economy in the world and as an incubator for high technology, biotechnology and agricultural advances.

California's leadership in education and the economy, however, is in danger of slipping. State education spending fell by $17 billion over the last three years, forcing schools to shorten the school year, increase class size, close school libraries and eliminate summer school among other actions.

In higher education, the loss of funding has pushed up fees at community colleges, California State Universities and the University of California, while the state is offering 15,000 fewer Cal Grants this year for students in need. Not as many students are getting into the colleges as more of them save seats for higher-paying, out-of-state students. Meanwhile, those who can afford the higher fees are struggling to get the courses they need to graduate as classes are cut. Students trying to transfer from community colleges into CSUs and UCs are hitting a wall. All of this is causing a bottleneck, delaying students' entry into the work force.

The spending cuts also hurt industry. Economists estimate education's contribution to labor productivity growth ranges between 13 percent and 30 percent. California employers are worried they won't find employees with the education and skills they need.

Our state has set some of the nation's highest academic standards for its youth, yet it is failing to provide sufficient resources for them to succeed. Only a few Californians know our per-pupil spending ranks far below the national average - near the bottom when compared with other states. California now faces two lawsuits, Robles-Wong v. California and Campaign for Quality Education v. California, over the lack of adequate funding for public education. In 2009, the Legislature adopted a resolution I carried stating its intention to bring per-pupil spending up to or beyond the national average and to cover the costs of educating California's diverse student population. This is imperative and we must immediately start figuring out how we are going to fulfill this promise.

One way we can tackle our deficient education funding is by overhauling our overly complex, irrational and inequitable school finance system. Plenty of studies have concluded financial reforms are necessary before we can make significant improvements to our schools, including the Getting Down to Facts studies at Stanford University, the Governor's Committee on Education Excellence and the Public Policy Institute of California. In our current system, an English Learner in one school gets a different level of resources than a similar English Learner in another school. If we create a new school finance structure that is simple, transparent and allocates funds in a more effective way, Californians will be willing to invest more in education.

With this goal in mind, I have introduced several bills over the last five years to develop a new structure. While the measures have received bipartisan support, they were either blocked by a fiscal committee or vetoed by a governor unwilling to commit to accomplishing such a challenging task. This year, I introduced Assembly Bill 18, which sets forth a detailed plan for a simplified school funding system based on the aforementioned studies. It passed the Assembly last month and is now pending in the Senate. Major reforms like these require thoughtful analysis and collaboration. I recently amended my bill based on suggestions I have received from stakeholders and anticipate more amendments as I move forward in the coming year.

AB 18 narrows hundreds of funding streams to three tributaries, leaving just a couple dozen in their existing form. The bill would first establish a base level of funding for all students and would ensure no school loses funds in the base year. Another stream would be devoted and weighted to English Learners and low-income students who need more resources to be successful, while the last would be devoted to quality classroom instruction giving local school districts several options to meet the varied needs of its students.

It doesn't make sense to distribute more money through a broken system, but it makes perfect sense to fix our school funding "engine" now, while the tank is unfortunately empty, so when we are able to fill it in the future, we will get better mileage out of it.

Making a smart investment in education now will bring substantial returns in the future by fueling our industries with the skilled workers they need to maintain the state's competitive edge in a global market, and by assuring every Californian has the opportunity to make a sustainable living wage. Everyone benefits.

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Thanks for the work, Julia. I know the Education Code has over 100,000 sections, rendering it an absolutely impossible morass. Cleaning it up during difficult financial times certainly seems like an appropriate way to create opportunity out of adversity. Of course, we need to reinstate our commitment to educating our future generations and one way is to force multi-national corporations to pay their fair share and close the loopholes that enable them to get tax breaks for shipping jobs oversees.

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This page contains a single entry by Guest published on July 13, 2011 9:29 AM.

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